Q&A 1.16.20

QUESTION

Read about your programs in a SOFREP article. Wanted to give you a little background, so perhaps you can help me with your system for my training goals.

Demographics: 60 yo, 5’5″, 145 lbs, decent shape

Military: USAF Pararescue Indoctrination training circa ’78, Army Airborne, Army SF Combat Diver School, washed out (blacked out) first week test

Current training: MMA (M-TH): BJJ 2x/wk, kickboxing 2x/wk

Goals: long-term health and fitness focus on endurance, strength and flexibility

Medical: right rotator cuff repaired, left rotator cuff pain, right knee multiple surgeries (running knee pain afterwards)

Previous training: Karate, P90, P90X, SEAL pre-workout category 2, CrossFit

Job: intellectual property law (patents, trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets, computer and internet law), can barter

ANSWER

Based on your current MMA/BJJ stuff, my guess is you’re getting in plenty of work capacity. The “holes” in your fitness seem to be max effort strength and endurance.
From our stuff, I’d recommend SF45 Bravo. The SF45 Programming is designed for older tactical/mountain athletes and has a strength, endurance, and chassis integrity (core) focus.
As written, SF45 Bravo is a 6 day/week program. With your current MMA/BJJ schedule, this would have you doing two-a-days – which I’m not sure you want to do.
So what I’d recommend is you alternate between your MMA/BJJ days, and SF45 Bravo programming. For example, Mon – SF45 Bravo, Tue – MMA/BJJ, Wed – MMA/BJJ, Thur – SF45 Bravo, Fri – MMA/BJJ, Sat – SF45 Bravo, Sun – total rest.
Follow the SF45 Bravo sessions in order …. don’t skip ahead or around. The programming is progressive – and sessions build upon one another.
If things are going well, you can try two-a-days a couple days a week – just watch for over training, and/or fatigue during your MMA/BJJ sessions.
– Rob

QUESTION

How could I sub rucking (not ruck running) into the bodyweight foundations program?  Why? I have a knee and foot that can ruck but don’t like running…

ANSWER

Ruck the prescribed distance with a 25# pack.
– Rob

QUESTION

Just purchased the fat loss plan.  I was hoping that you could give some advice.
I am in season for some of my main personal activities – splitboarding, snowboarding and then some ice climbing or mountaineering, conditions pending.  Fell a bit off the wagon the last few months and definitely need to lose fat but do not want to compromise any of my activities.  Felt this was a better plan as it will still keep me strong and I won’t be killing my body with training to ruin my weekend performance.
Questions:
1 – I have a garage gym.  How can I sub the shuttle, prone to sprint, etc. running with a treadmill or alternative given lack of space?
2 – If I do my mountain activities on the weekend, and I do not want to be sore from them, how should I space out my training during the week?  Or should I exaggerate a week, meaning stretch it out into a week and a half to allow two rest days?
Female, 41
Of course, if you think that there is a better plan for me…feel free to suggest but I am not much of a runner other than for intervals.

ANSWER

1) Go outside for the sprints, or do 30/30 Box Jump intervals @ 20″ for the prescribed time. Okay to run on a treadmill, but I’d recommend running outside if it’s 10-degrees or warmer.
2) Follow the plan sessions in order (don’t skip ahead or around), and take Monday off to recover from the mountain days, and fridays off to rest before them.
3) The Fat Loss Plan is work capacity focused …. to complement your mountain activities I’d recommend a more balanced plan, specifically I’d recommend Frank Church from our Wilderness Professional Packet. This is a balanced training plan which concurrently trains strength, work capacity, chassis integrity and mountain endurance (uphill movement under load, running). Again, take Monday’s and Friday’s off, and only follow the programming Tue-Thu. Follow the sessions in order – as they are progressive.
This plan includes barbell strength, etc. and I’m assuming you know your way around a weightroom.
– Rob

QUESTION

I would like to introduce myself and explain my situation.  I am looking for advice and I am hoping you can help me out.
On Saturday November 28, 2020, I will be climbing one of the worlds tallest structure, the CN Tower (1776 steps, 144 flights).  Before I do that I need help, a lot of help.
Background:
I am a 33 year old male, 6’0, 220 pounds.
I work in law enforcement.  I work a 12 hour shift, on a 5 on 5 off rotation.
Growing up I was athletic, playing football, hockey and baseball.  When i graduated from the police academy five years ago, I could complete the goals listed below.
I am embarrassed to say that today, I am unable to run for 5 minutes before stopping.  I can only do 5 or so push ups.  The other day I was climbing  stairs and I was exhausted after climbing 4 flights.
Goals:
Successfully climb the CN Tower.  The record for the fastest climb is 7 minutes.  The average time is 40 minutes.  I am just looking to finish it.
My current weight is 220lbs.  I would like to get  between 170-180 lbs.
Complete 50 consecutive push ups.
Complete 20 consecutive pull ups.
Hold a 2 minute plank.
Run 1.5 miles (2.4 Kilometres) in 10 minutes.
Run 3 miles (5 Kilometres) in 25 minutes
Run 6 miles (10 kilometres) in 1 hour.
Fitness Equipment:
Here is the fitness equipment I have access to.
I have a small home gym in my basement which includes a treadmill and a free weight dumbbell set from 3 to 60lbs.  I have one flat bench and an exercise ball.
I reside in a small town in Northern Ontario.  That means the winters are long and harsh.  Unfortunately I am only able to run outside or conduct any outdoor physical activity between the middle of April to the end of November.
Our town has one public gym.  It includes all your usual gym equipment including one StairMaster.
The tallest building in town is a Holiday Inn hotel with four flights of stairs.  With that being said, I won’t be able to train using real stairs.
The town has one big hill I could use to train.  It’s approximately a 500 metre incline from top to bottom.
I also have access to a 400 metre track and a bicycle.
I am not much of a swimmer but our town has one pool which is 25 metres in length.  That could be incorporated in the program as well should you see fit.
I would prefer scheduling exercise days on my days off from work as at this point in time I feel it’s almost impossible to complete a serious workout after working 12-14 hour shifts.
Objective:
With this information I am hoping you can design a one time individual training plan to help me reach my goal.  The training program would be designed for 10 months.
I am hoping to start training anytime in the end of January 2020.  This would be give me 10 months of training before the CN Tower climb.
If you have any questions or require more information please let you me know.
Thank you in advanced for your help.

ANSWER

I’m sorry, I don’t do any individualized programming. Please don’t be offended – I simply don’t have time given my other programming demands.
From what we do have, here is what I recommend.
1. Fix your diet. I’d like to see you at 185-200#. Here are our nutrition recommendations. These aren’t complicated. They just take discipline. 90% of fat is diet-related. Clean up your diet and you’ll shed fat. Getting lighter will help everything – running, movement, uphill movement, pull ups, push ups, etc.
2. Programming – we believe tactical athletes should focus their fitness training on the mission-direct fitness demands of your job. Start our stuff with the LE OnRamp Training Plan. The first 4 weeks of the plan deploy bodyweight strength training. Beginning week 5, the program switches to free weight (barbell/dumbbell) strength training. The plan also includes work capacity, chassis integrity (core), short endurance (running) and work capacity. It’s a full-on, multi-modal training plan.
3. After completing LE OnRamp, move to the plans/order in the Spirits Packet of plans designed as day to day programming for full-time LE patrol/detectives. These plans concurrently train strength, upper body hypertrophy (mass), work capacity (sprint-based), chassis integrity, short endurance and tactical agility. The sessions are designed to last 40-50 minutes long. Start with Whiskey – the first plan in the packet.
Between LE OnRamp and the plans in the Spirits Packet, you’re looking at 42 weeks – or 9.5 months of programming.
Both LE OnRamp and the Spirits Packet of plans are 7 week long cycles, 5 days/week. We recommend you aim to stick with a 5 on, 2 off schedule. This means you’ll need to train during you duty days. It’s best to train before your shift, not after.
4. 7 weeks out from your CN Tower Climb, drop out of the Spirits Packet plans and complete the Backcountry Ski Preseason Training Plan. This plan has an intense step up progression (uphill endurance), as well as lower body strength, leg lactate tolerance, and general endurance work which will transfer well to your CN Tower Climb. The plan calls for loaded step ups, but as I understand it, you’ll complete the event unloaded …. so complete the step ups in the plan unloaded.
Good luck and email questions.
– Rob

QUESTION

Do you guys have a plan for law enforcement K9 officers? And Marine officers?

ANSWER

We recommend K9 officers follow our LE Patrol/Detective programming found in the Spirits Packet Plans. These plans concurrently train strength, work capacity, short endurance, upper body hypertrophy, chassis integrity (core) and tactical agility. Start with Whiskey.
We do have a K9 Handler Fitness Assessment – which includes work with your dog.
Marine Officer? Our Greek Hero packet of plans is designed for military infantry and SOF. These plans concurrently train strength, military endurance (run, ruck), work capacity, chassis integrity and tactical agility.
However, if you are a full time K9 officer and a reserve Marine officer, we recommend you train for your full time job – with the Spirits Packets plans.
– Rob

QUESTION

I am a current owner of your TACP program. I am interested in finding a program that I can use leading up to the timeline prescribed with your TACP program. What would you recommend?
I am going through the National Guard route, so I’m in a bit of a holding pattern until a slot opens up. I am expected to be able to meet the basic PT qualifications until things with my application become formalized.
Given this limbo, any guidance would be greatly appreciated.

ANSWER

I’d recommend doing the TACP Plan now. After, drop into the plans/order in the Greek Hero Packet, beginning with Hector. Then, when you get a school date, re-do the TACP plan directly before.
– Rob

QUESTION

I apologize if this is already answered in the FAQ, but I did not see this specific of a question. I am looking for a program that would build strength and aerobic capacity. Which program would be appropriate?

ANSWER

– Rob

QUESTION

Looking for a program for the new 22 osut infantry

ANSWER

– Rob

QUESTION

I see you have a lot of different training plans and the occupation I’m training for is a LE ranger through NPS hopefully doing alpine rescue. Do you suggest to go with the law enforcement training route or the mountain training route?

ANSWER

Usually I’d recommend the plans/order in the Wilderness Packet for wilderness professionals – rangers, wardens, field biologists, mountain SAR, etc., but I’m assuming Alpine Rescue = climbing/rope system work, so I’d recommend the plans/order in the Greek Heroine Packet – as these include climbing training. Start with Helen.
– Rob

QUESTION

I’ve read and seen a bunch of conflicting stuff out there. Since I’m giving your program a try, I will go with your word. Is it okay, healthy, and safe to lift when your sore?

ANSWER

We do all the time. It goes away shortly into the session, then comes back after! Soreness decreases as fitness improves.
– Rob

QUESTION

I recently started Mtn Tactical’s Fortitude program and had a quick question for you. I tried doing sandbag get ups at the recommended weight of 65lbs however I was unable to get off the ground. In fact I could barely separate my shoulders from the ground. I currently weigh 165lbs and will eventually move onto the CSOR program come next March.
Would an appropriate compromise be to work with less weight for sand bag get ups and use the prescribed weight for other sandbag related exercises? I have successfully done get ups with a 50lbs bag.

ANSWER

Try harder. Should be no problem for you. Make sure your technique is dialed … roll into your armpit, push up on your elbow, lunge up: https://mtntactical.com/exercises/mnt403-sandbag-getup/
– Rob

QUESTION

I recently finished up a selection course and am looking to transfer my workouts from a more endurance and body weight focused realm to hard on strength and general operational capability. Naturally your Greek Hero/ Operator series drew my attention. My main focus is to really ramp up my strength both lower body and upper, with an emphasis on squats (maybe DL), shoulders (my weakest area) and BW Bench Reps  I would ideally like to do this without sacrificing all of my work capacity. Is there a specific program or flow of programs you might recommend for this?

ANSWER

I’d recommend Apollo. Multi-modal plan with strength emphasis, but also includes unloaded running, work cap, and chassis integrity.
– Rob

QUESTION

47 yr old overweight vet, corrective surgical right ankle / fibula
history, compression fracture in lower back, made it out of my wheel
chair, up on my feet and looking to rebuild.
I have access to a gym & track. I didn’t see a specific plan that
quite fits my description. Could you please recommend a mtn.
restoration plan?

ANSWER

Big 3 + Running Training Plan. Be smart/caution with the strength loading, and run/walk the prescribed running distance as needed …. but complete the distance.
– Rob

QUESTION

I’m trying to push for a 300 in the APFT, so I’ve been trying out your APFT plan.  I’m having some issues with the pushup progression.  I can score between 66-69 pushups on the APFT.  The issue I’m having is that I can’t make it through all 6 sets of 75s of 30% of my pushups without reaching muscle failure early in set 5.  Is it better to 1) take a longer rest in-between sets, 2) drop the amount of reps per set, or 3) drop to my knees and do pushups this way for the remaining reps?  Any other advice?

ANSWER

This isn’t unusual. Drop to your knees to finish. It’s embarrassing, I know, because I have to do it too!

– Rob


QUESTION

What is the shortest plan you have? How long? What kind of plan is it?

ANSWER

MTI Relative Strength Assessment Training Plan is close, 5 weeks, strength focus.
– Rob

 

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