Q&A 7.21.22

QUESTION

Do you have any recommendations for implementing training for the 5000 meter row in the 7 week ACFT plan?

ANSWER

Replace the 2 mile run with the 5000m row and replace the run-interval programming with the the rowing-only programming in the 5,000m Row Training Plan.
– Rob

QUESTION

I’ve been a MTI subscriber for several years and recently used the 50 mile ultra running training plan to finish my first 65km alpine ultr-marathon (65km; 7:33:00, 7,860 ft of climbing). Full disclosure I cursed Rob each gym session that had leg blasters, but it paid off in the end.

3(right now I’m 41 yrs, 6’1”, 178 lbs). I’ve looked at the Hypertrophy for Skinny Guys, Ultimate Meathead Cycle, Off-Season Strength Training for Endurance Athletes, and In-Season Strength Training for Endurance Athletes. In the mid and long term, I’ll keep running ultra-marathons (one or two a year) and run other half and full marathons throughout.

My initial thought is to work with the Off-Season Strength Training for Endurance Athletes or Hypertrophy for Skinny Guys for much of the summer while I scale back running miles over the summer. It’s just too hot here in Montenegro to train hard outside all summer.

I wonder if you guys have any better recommendations?

Thanks for the help and keep up the great work.

ANSWER

There’s a difference between adding strength, and hypertrophy. My sense is with all your running, simply by pulling back on it, and doing some solid strength training you’ll add muscle … Hypertrophy is adding mass, for mass sake, and I wouldn’t go this direction.
Given that … options:
– Rob

QUESTION

Have visited your website multiple times due to recommendation from a.third.option, which is a military Instagram account.

I have been looking through your extensive training plans and struggling to find one that works for me.  Quick background about me – commissioned as an Infantry Officer and I am leaving for IBOLC in November. There is a solid chance that I will attend Ranger school as well. I am about 6’5 and 230 lbs. My running is were I lack at the most. Naturally, I have looked into your Ranger Training plan and wondering if that is the right thing for me right now.

So my question is, what training plan do you think would work best for me? I would like to decrease my 5 mile run time substantially, but also maintain my strength or even improve it.

ANSWER

You’ve got 22 weeks until November. Here’s what I recommend:
Weeks.       Plan
8-14           Valor
15-22         IBOLC Training Plan – Repeat weeks 5 & 6 to stretch to 8 weeks.
Wait until you get a Ranger School date before completing that plan.
– Rob

QUESTION

I was looking through your Military Plans.

I am wondering what the difference is between your Base Programming: Daily Operator Sessions (which I see involve sessions such as Cream Soda, Root Beer, Diet Coke, etc.) compared to the Greek/Virtue Series Plans. I see that the Busy Operator Sessions derive from the Greek/Virtue Series Plans, however I do not understand where the plans Cream Soda, Root Beer, Diet Coke, etc. come from.

ANSWER

The Daily Operator Sessions is the cutting edge of MTI’s military programming. It’s where we started, and where I deploy my most recent thinking.
Greek Hero and all our plans which can be purchased individually first appeared in the Daily Operator Sessions. The archives go back several years.
– Rob

QUESTION

I am a 29 year old smokejumper out of Redmond Oregon. I am writing because I have some questions on injury prevention due to high speed impacts. I have been using mountain tactical programs for about a year now and think they are fantastic, I have a lot of respect for what you guys are doing. Unfortunately in my short career I have seen multiple femur and/or pelvis fractures due to hard impact on landing the parachute. The ideal situation is obviously to not land hard but it happens to even the best parachutists I work with. It’s an unpredictable environment. So to get to my question, what would be the best ways to reduce the chance of breaking something on Impact or increase your odds of being able to land hard and not get injured? I have thoughts on this, such as strengthening legs and increasing muscle size for protection, but I could also see how maybe this added weight could work against you? Anyways, I would be very curious in hearing anything you guys have to offer about this subject and I would surely pass it along to my bros. Just a smokejumper trying to have a long and healthy career!

ANSWER

First – by far improving landing technique to at a minimum ensure landings on relatively flat ground go as planned will be the best bang for your buck in terms of injury prevention.
I can’t help with specifics there – you know better than I.. But, rarely does technique improve without a lot of reps, which are hard to get doing the real thing. …. not sure what training apparatus you have to work with but doing depth jumps from 4-6 feet would be a start. You could also manipulate the landing surface with angles to practice that element. Be resourceful.
Second – after technique, strength is the best durability buffer. The trick here is how to train the specific strength you need for this event …. you can do squats and dead lifts … but the issue is that a landing trains eccentric strength – the shortening of the muscle – not concentric strength – which typical squats and deadlifts train.
My go to for eccentric leg strength training is the leg blaster complex. It’s bodyweight, but has proven itself again and again to train the eccentric leg strength needed for skiing and downhill hiking under load.
Next – My sense also is that loaded depth jumps – i.e. wearing a loaded pack or weight vest – from 3-6 feet, would be another way so sport-specifically train the specific strength needed for landing. I’ve actually done these with my freeskiers to prepare them for the eccentric strength demand of landing after a cliff jump, etc.
So … I’d recommend practicing depth jump-based landing technique, unloaded, in varying conditions first.
Then add loaded depth jumps to a flat surface …. and after you gained strength, begin to incorporate an uneven landing surface at various angles to not only continue to train strength, but add in landing technique practice under load. The ultimate here would be to practice technique using depth jumps wearing your full kit and gear … as best possible. Remember that it doesn’t have to imitate the real thing ….. do your best to create a system which gets close, but is easy enough in terms of equipment, time, gear that it allows you to practice lots of reps, 2-3x week.
Finally – supplement your leg strength training with the leg blaster complex. Work up to 5 rounds of a full leg blaster, with a 60 sec. rest between, 2x/week. This whole thing will take about 12 minutes.
– Rob

QUESTION

What’s happening MTI warriors?  BLUF:  I need something new and I am not sure what to do.  My goals are:
-Gain strength
-Improve endurance, stamina, work capacity
-Prevent injury
I’ve been consistently training for many years.  I am a 42 year-young man serving on active-duty in a desk job, but I’d like to believe I can and will someday have to run and gun like I did in my younger years.  I want something that involves lifting with HIIT incorporated to tax my system as combat would.  I’ve got access to a fully loaded gym but I am having trouble deciding on a program.  I’ve looked through a number of the military programs but there are so many to choose from.   What do you recommend?

ANSWER

– Rob

QUESTION

I had a few questions regarding preparation for SFAS.
My report date is in October so I can’t follow the full 52 week program. I am by no means out of shape but at the same time I’m lacking in a few areas. In terms of cardio I’m pretty decent. My last recorded 2 mile time was a 13:30 and my last 4 mile time was about a 28:30 (I haven’t ran a timed 5 mile recently). I can run 6+ miles at an 8ish minute pace with ease but obviously I need more speed work. My main concern is that I think I lack full body strength which, of course, is pivotal in injury prevention. The goal is to follow the 8 week ruck selection packet for the last few months leading up to selection but I was wondering what program would be recommended to add some mass, strength, endurance and help improve the APFT simultaneously?

ANSWER

You’ve got 17 weeks until October 1. Here’s what I recommend:
Weeks.      Plan
1-7            Fortitude
8-9            Valor – first 2 weeks
10-17        Ruck-Based Selection Training Plan – 8 weeks directly before selection. This plan includes focused APFT programming.
– Rob

QUESTION

Can you help me choose between training packages? What are the key differences between BDLE / Great Plains Tribe / Three stooges pacakages? All seem to focus on building general (civilian) fitness with limited equipment. Can you point out differences in:
– amount of equipment needed, e.g. BDLE mentions you need dumbell/kb set, other only mention #25lbs dumbells
– time commitment required (per sessions)
– complexity of exercises in plan
– overall load and intensity of plans -> if I would purchase all 3 packages in which would you recommend I complete and why?
Many thanks in advance for your support.

ANSWER

3 Stooges are full on 60 min sessions built around around a full set of dumbbells/kettlebells.
BDLE- are 45 min sessions, multi-modal training plans, but have limited equipment:
  • 40# Sandbag (women), 60# Sandbag (men)
  • Full set of dumbbells (15-45# for women, 25-55# for men) and/or kettlebells. A set of adjustable dumbbells like these will work as well. 
  • Pull Up Bar
  • 16-20″ box, bench or step for step ups and box jumps
  • Smartphone with repeating countdown interval timer application or watch with a second hand …
  • Foam Roller
Great Plains plans are similar to the BDLE plans, but go over 45-min sessions – esp. on the endurance days. These also are multi-modal (strength, work cap, endurance, chassis integrity). Equipment needed:
  • Sandbag (Women – 40#, Men – 60#)
  • Backpack or Ruck
  • Pair of Dumbbells (Women – 15#, Men – 25#)
  • Pull Up Bar
  • Foam Roller
  • 16-20″ Bench, Box or Chair for Step Ups
For you? If you’ve got longer than 45 min to train, do the Great Plains Plans. If not, do the BDLE Plans.
 
Know that you’ll need a full set of dumbbells/kettlebells (25-55#) for the BDLE Plans. The great plains plans only require one pair of 25# dumbbells. 
 
– Rob

QUESTION

A few yrs back, 2019-2020, I signed up for and completed your Goruck Selection training plan (that was tough!).  This time around, I’ve got a 5-day backpacking trip to the High Sierras in California, starting in July 24, and I was wondering what training program I should take to prepare for it.  It will be a guided hike (group of 8), but most of the hike will be off-trail (85%), between 8,000-12,000’ with most of it spent above 10,500’, covering between 8-12 miles.  The emphasis will be on navigation skills and off-trail backpacking.  We’ll be travelling mostly over granite slab and tundra, w some talus/scree.  I mention this bc this will complicate movement.  I’m 50 yrs old, 5’-11”, weigh bw 177-179#, routinely ruck w a 60# pack and I’m capable of hiking long days, covering 25 miles or more.  I live and train at sea lvl (580’).  I’ll be the second oldest guy (the oldest is 62) amongst a group of ppl mostly in their 40s & 30s, some of whom live in CO, CA, & OR and are able to train and hike at higher elevations.  Their relative youth and environment will give them an advantage, which I hope to offset through training.  While it is not a competition and we will be working together as a team, I don’t want to be the slowest or weakest link.
So, which program should I choose in the six weeks I have before I head out?

ANSWER

Backpacking Pre-Season Training Plan. Start at the beginning and go through week 6.
– Rob

QUESTION

I have recently signed up for Mountain Tactical and i am loving it. I am police officer in Canada just north of Toronto. I have recently passed our K9 physical but i have hell week in the fall for selection. I am currently doing the swat selection programming. I was wondering if you guys would consider making a canine program?

What package do you recommend to prepare for selection?

ANSWER

After SWAT Selection, drop into the plans/order in the Gun Maker Packet, beginning with Ruger. Then 7 weeks out from selection, drop out of the Gun Maker plans and re-complete the SWAT Selection Training Plan.
K9 Plans? – Nothing specific to K9 officers right now, however, I did create a K9 Officer Fitness Assessment, which includes some dog work.
Good luck at Hell Week!
– Rob

QUESTION

I work for a LE agency. Next March or April I am planning on attending our county’s SWAT selection. I am planning on purchasing the SWAT training plan next year and doing the 7 week cycle. Is there a general plan that is lower intensity I could run through a few times before next year that would best prepare me for the SWAT cycle? For reference, I am familiar with selection workup plans from my two workups (thank God the second one was successful) to Ranger School while in the army.

Since beginning of my career in LE in 2020 I have been on graves, my workouts have become significantly shorter, about 30 minutes, and less frequent, max 4 times a week. I know the SWAT cycle requires more time, so I would like to prep my body again to handle the pre-selection load next year without sustaining injuries.

ANSWER


QUESTION

I am a police officer planning to attempt selection for a tactical unit. One of the assessment components includes a loaded run assessment where applicants have to run 3 laps of 500 meters in under 3 minutes whilst in uniform wearing a 25lbs plate carrier, duty belt with full kit and holding a rifle in low carry. There is a 30-second passive recovery in between laps. This is a pass/fail assessment and applicants are not competitively assessed on their time.
I gave this a try the other week and found this to be very challenging on my calves and shins and I was gassed by the end of it. I developed shin splints that lasted for about a week. Running has never been my strong suit. To put it in context, every time I run an aerobic base building program that involves running for a long duration of time (typically 30 – 60 min or more of low intensity or zone 2), I end up developing shin splints after about 2 weeks or so. I understand the importance of developing a solid aerobic base but I am getting frustrated with the continual injuries.
It’ll be great to get your advice on how to train for this loaded run assessment and also get your recommendation on the programs to develop a solid aerobic base for running.

ANSWER

I’m not sure your timeline, so without knowing I’d recommend starting with the 1.5 Mile Run Training Plan, unloaded.
Also – I’d recommend purchasing a pair of Green Superfeet Orthotics, and Hoka One One running shoes.
Plus – research Chi Running or POSE Running, and work on your running form while completing this plan.
3-4 weeks in, re-try the assessment.
– Rob

 

Leave a Reply